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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
from refreshments and drinks with us. we have so much to celebrate tonight. >> and so many honorees to celebrate and are you true partners in making san francisco the best city in america in 2012. [applause] >> our theme for tonight's celebration is "community unity" because it's because of the collective efforts of the honorees across the diverse fields that bind us together. >> as we talk about about your programs and the media brings hope what means most to the community. we're we honor your success to san francisco or your distribution to the small businesses or the community or the youth or bringing the diversity to us through intricate sound. >> whether we inspire us in the community and bringing safety and respect to the most vulnerable among us. >> we salute all of our honorees tonight that bring pride and diggity to the san francisco latino community and let's give them all a round of applause to what they bring to our city of san francisco. [applause] >> so we know that every great city needs a equally great leader and our first presenter tonight is exactly that. he recog
also have the director of hud here and he is going to lead us and then we will have mayor lee up in a moment. >> thank you very much and it really is a privilege to be here with you today and to build on henry's comments and it's extraordinary that the grants across the country that were awarded to hud two of them are in the same state and it's more extraordinary that both of them are in the same city, san francisco so congratulations. [cheers and applause] so for context i just want to mention a few things and this is no news to all of you here in the room and the people standing up with me today, but today in america more than 10 million people are living in neighborhoods of concentrated poverty and limited investment and opportunities for themselves and their children, and we know that one of the most important factors in determining the economic and financial success of peoples whether or not a child grows up in those high poverty neighborhoods? a. the fact that we can predict health, education outcomes of children based on the zip code, where they live is really a tragedy an
importantly we knew if we didn't just talk the talk, that if we actually took the residents with us, and took all of the talent that we had in the city from the housing authority to our mayor's office of housing, to the redevelopment people, to the private developers, to the staff that has been so diligent, to the private nonprofit sector. the in incredible community based organizations and the bay view y and all these wonderful people that have been struggling for years saying "can we get some help? can we get some love in the town? can we do something that will get us all together? and we can all these nonprofits and bridge and mercy and coming together saying we can all do it and we team up with hope sf and the partners they created in saying it's not just brick and mortar that we're doing here. it's people first. the first thing that we have to do is bring hope to the people living there and then we went about saying what is the best way to do it? what are the best examples of rebuilding -- not housing. we said rebuild community. that's what we invested in and that's where the labo
. that is right in their box. for us, the capacity for us to do the smaller side is not there as much as it is for them. on getting a loan through my side of the bank, i do not require an account to do that. we would like to have it, but i do not require it. >> last question for the opportunity fund and a critic representative. are you a cdfi? is san francisco and s.p.a. in support of cdfi's being established in san francisco? >> yes, we are. we were founded in 1999 with a small business loan. that is how we started our tenderloin office. >> opportunity fund is a certified cdfi, so we are providing a benefit to low and moderate-income communities. he is the city establishing support for new cdfi's? >> mark wanted to address that, in support of cdfi's in the city. >> we have a wealth of partners in the city. s.p.a. is just now rolling out a program for r -- will be the case by the summer. let me get one last point and on the question about relationships to lenders. the question was, do have to have an account with a bank in order to get a loan? may answer is no, but the real answer to
of all of us. i'm the principal investigator on this project and that means that i'm supposed to be in charge of making sure it happens. so, we're 70% done and you're seeing one of the major parts of it today. and i want to introduce susan so we can get the show on the road. so, thank you so much. (applause) >> well, i want to welcome you all here today for the launch of our state offices aids renovation project otherwise known as soar. and i'm susan buck binder. i'm speaking on behalf of the entire aids office. we are fortunate to be a world class research organization housed within the health department which is pretty much unique globally. we have three amazing sections that we work with. the first is the surveillance epidemiology section. they really started at the very beginning of the hiv epidemic in tracking what was then known as grid and other term and became aids and then also tracking new cases of hiv infection. and, so, there's really been leaders around the world in how to track trends in new infections and that is what helps us drive both our prevention and our t
free public power to the city of san francisco. one of my favorite lines mike just used is this measure is about consolidating from 8 reservoirs to 7. another way to say that is to say this is about draining one of them, the hetch hetchy valley. have other studies said this is feasible? sure, just like tearing down city hall or knocking down the golden gate bridge, that's possible but not feasible. we're not going to spend 3 billion dollars to tear down the hetch hetchy dam. let's not forget, we are also stewards for two dozen cities in the peninsula. over 2 million californians benefit from the foresight of our forefathers almost 100 years ago in building hetch hetchy. while the rest of the state is tying themselves up in knots trying to figure out where to get their water. not only did we have the type of water storage hetch hetchy provides, not only today but in the future, we are in a solid place. and to spend this kind of money, and let's just talk about the $8 million dollars, i think that's one thing we can agree on. this calls for us to spend $8 million do
and others to use public transportation. it will work for all of us and as we build the housing units we identified in hunter's point and treasure island and welcome more people to our great city and we are growing as a result. we are going to have the greatest subway system that can connect to our bart, to our caltrans, to up and down our muni lines. this central subway will be a great success. it will connect to some of the most densely populated and rapidly developing areas, and it will improve access to all of our vibrant communities, and really is investments like this that will foster loyalty among all of our public transit customers while we reduce carbon emissions, make our city cleaner and cleaner. i'm not the only one that thinks this way. you know i'm among many, many friends today in the audience, on stage and i would like to invite at this time someone who has made it a practice to visit our city regularly, to make sure this project was being planned well, that the initial funds that were granted to us by president obama and with the great work of our congressional delega
to invite and introduce someone who has been hard at work for all of us, who understands latino community, asian community, african-american community, the san francisco community, and our values. someone who has fought for over 25 years for all of us. please welcome the next speaker of the house leader nancy pelosi. [applause] >> thank you very much mr. mayor for your kind introduction. your nice words of recognition how we worked together and for calling all of us together and a real cause for celebration, latino heritage month. we are very proud of your leadership in recognizing the excellence in the community to take leading roles in the administration of this under your leadership the best city in america. where did you go? the best city in america. [applause] our district attorney, to you, counsel general, to you, and all of the leadership in the room and thank you for your leadership in making this event such a special one. it takes place in the context of a year when president barack obama recognized the leadership of the community by giving the presidential medal of freedom,
permanent working capital for their business on an ongoing basis. in some cases, one can be used interchangeably. typically, what you are describing is a line of credit. when you go to a lender, you want to show them that you have the contracts that will be able to pay. lines of credit are typically going to be based on the credit scores of the business in this case. an important piece is making sure we do everything to know what our credit scores are. >> what is an average to good credit score? >> mark mentioned the 650. 65250 to 700 is typically what e see. when credit markets are tight for financing and regulators are cautious about seeing their banks make loans, they keep pushing the credit scores further and further up. that is why it is an important avenue to be able to have non- traditional lenders, like opportunity funds and micro lenders, who can look at a business and see a credit score that might not be strong, but there might be a story behind that number. medical issues, other things that do not impact your business but impact your credit score. they can hear your st
and continues to make and help guide us at the national level in terms of the epidemic. today the celebration of bridge research is just another step forward, a huge step forward in the city's remarkable leadership at the local, national, and international level in hiv prevention care and treatment. and the bridge research team, the history has just been remarkable in terms from the early days of the epidemic, in terms of the natural history of the disease, vaccine research, prevention measures, prophylaxis, treatment, testing technologies. as susan was saying, bringing this all together was integrating with surveillance work, with prevention work, and with community-based organizations. and this is really the san francisco model that really resonates in terms of how we approach the epidemic. the research is eloquent, it's rigorous, and it involves community at all levels. and that is something i think we really need to celebrate about what bridge research means today. so, at the office of national aids policy, our job is to implement the president's national hiv/aids strategy. the president
everyone. mark quinn is the san francisco district director of the u.s. small business administration. the small business administration covers not only san francisco proper but the bay area. the severed his third district is responsible for a business loan portfolio of 12,000 loans worth $4.2 billion. in 2009, the sba approved $500 million in lending. next, we have the executive director of the san francisco small business office. she was in san francisco in 1986 to open the buffalo exchange limited store, and in the 13 years she worked for buffalo exchange, tennis district manager, she held her open the company from four to 11 stores. in 2009, the mayor appointed her as executive director to the office of small businesses. next, we have the ceo of opportunity funds. he has combined his background as a community organizer with an education from stanford to develop an innovative, not-for- profit financial incision that uses market principles to affect systemic change. it operates one of the nation's largest individual development, programs, a leading provider of micro loans in califor
the denser parts of san francisco, as someone who doesn't have a car i have and millions of us have wasted countless hours trying to get through our downtown corridor but i want to take a moment to thank the most important folks who are not here with us and that is the people of san francisco. for years before i joined the board of supervisors i served on with many volunteers the community advisory group to the central subway. with countless volunteers from the bay view, from visitation valley, from mission bay, south of market, union square, and of course thousands of residents and leaders from chinatown who went to countless public meetings provided tens of thousands of signatures, and stood for years to work extremely hard for world class transportation into the heart of our city, but we know we are building the central subway not just based on our history but for our future. by the year 2040 we will have 100,000 new households and 200,000 new workers and thousands of new daily car trips. we have to prepare for the future. let me close with a couple of quick thoughts. first i belie
that we lost and what emboldens us today is that this world class research institution is not only saving lives by treating, but it's coming up with revolutionery cutting edge prevention techniques. and i'm very proud to work for the obama administration, for secretary, as grant said, that has not only focused on treatment and research, but prevention in so many things. and, so, my story is not unique. but on behalf of the obama administration, on behalf of secretary kathleen sebelius, i'm here to say thank you for the work of san francisco and the local, at the state, and at the national/international level has done for more than 30 years that have saved lives, that have built commutes, that have allowed families to come together and grow. because this is not 1981. it's almost 2013. and this place is revolutionery and this 9-1/2 million will continue to make it the pinnacle of world research and prevention on hiv. so, thank you very, very much for having me here. (applause) >> i just looked over my shoulder and here is dr. george rutherford, director of the aids office when i came here m
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)